Culture

Take me to your favorite spark,
and show me that you have never been watched
By the hawk that hunts the walking
By the wind that takes the talking
By the sky that sees you come and need you every day

Side Note: One of first songs I heard outside of Kyuss and Sleep that sparked my love affair with desert rock. The main guitar riff is achingly hypnotic that puts me in a semi-trance.

Music of the Day: Quest For Fire – The Hawk That Hunts The Walking

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Business, Technology

Facebook just sent a chill over every digital news organization | Quartz

Alice Truong, Quartz:

Today (June 29), the world’s largest social network announced a change to its news feed algorithm that will show its 1.65 billion monthly active users more posts from friends and family. The tweak also means that articles posted by news organizations, which have grown dependent on Facebook for traffic and ad revenue, won’t feature as prominently on users’ news feeds.

With Facebook’s push for media brands to use Instant Articles and now this news feed algorithm change, it sounds like Facebook doesn’t want to send the Internet to your media brand, but wants to be the Internet that your brand exists on.

Link
Culture

Side Note: The video, titled Lothric in Stop Motion was made by YouTube user, Green Toast, who uploads some stellar videos from the Dark Souls franchise. In this case, it’s absolutely astounding how he captured the beauty of Dark Souls 3 through stop motion animation. For example, he probably cleared a few levels without using the bonfire teleporting (it resets enemies), just to get a seamless animation going. And I just love the moments when the play character faces the screen, does a weapon art or a costume change. It’s just beautiful.

Music of the Day: Kashiwa Daisuke – April No. 2

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Culture

Side Note: I’ve been playing A LOT of Dark Souls 3 recently. It truly is a masterpiece of a video game, and it’s definitely one of the most cinematic pieces of art I’ve had the pleasure of interracting with. RoeTaka has definitely created something beautiful with his interpretations of the game’s musical score, and I just get lost watching him play the game with his music in the background.

Music of the Day: RoeTaka – All For One

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Affairs, Culture

The New York Times: The Reality Behind Singlish

In response to an opinion by Gwee Li Sui: Do You Speak Singlish?

Li Lin Chang in a letter to The New York Times:

Gwee Li Sui’s “Politics and the Singlish Language” (Opinion, May 13) makes light of the government’s efforts to promote the mastery of standard English by Singaporeans…

… But English is not the mother tongue of most Singaporeans. For them, mastering the language requires extra effort. Using Singlish will make it harder for Singaporeans to learn and use standard English. Not everyone has a Ph.D. in English Literature like Mr. Gwee, who can code-switch effortlessly between Singlish and standard English, and extol the virtues of Singlish in an op-ed written in polished standard English.

Everything about Li Lin Chang’s response to Gwee Li Sui’s opinion regarding celebrating Singlish as an unofficial creole, irks me through my skin. She sounds elitist, as if the only people who should be entitled to use Singlish are those who have a level of proficiency of the English language and can code switch. The initial sentence is just condescending to the entire opinion that Gwee has outlined, and has also given more examples about how Singlish is used at an everyday speak.

Never mind that almost anybody who needs to add an air of authenticity to the persuasions, would also use Singlish to connect to the masses. I’ve noticed it in formal education (Any teacher who isn’t an English language teacher, tends to revert to Singlish to communicate complex lessons, and yes, politicians have definitely started to impart their slogans in Singlish or in a dialect.

It’s good to be versed in English since its a global language of business and there have been many merits for being able to communicate with the International market, but Singlish is something that we use conversationally, and not for international business or relations. If anything, it’s a cultural phenomena that we use to be ourselves, to escape from the druddgeries of daily toil. It’s us in our home clothes.

If Singaporeans have a poor proficiency in the English language, it’s not because we use Singlish, but more because we simply don’t practice standard English enough.

Link
Culture

Tony Molina – Don't Come Back from Renny McCauley on Vimeo.

I can hang a second time
When I’m with you I lose my mind
You build me up to tear me down
And I hope that you don’t come back now

Side Note: Got this off a good mate of mine; and damn it’s so infectious. I’ve been listening to the entire record on repeat for the past day.

Music of the Day: Tony Molina – Don’t Come Back

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