A-Town Boyz

Executive Director, Spike Lee and Director, Eunice Lau, explore Asian American gang culture and power struggles. It sounds like a very compelling story.

Quartz also opines further, regarding the complexity of race and culture in multicultural society, suggesting that model minority stereotypes (read: over-achieving Asian) hurts the diaspora more than it helps it.

… the film shows how non-achievers turn to gang life to find a kinship they never knew at home or school, and a means to make money they never had.

Edit: Adding this quote from the film’s synopsis, that makes me want to watch this even more now.


It’s 2:08 AM in Sydney, Australia right now. I flew out from Singapore at 1:45 AM the day before, and it’s actually 11:08 PM in Singapore now.

I feel like I’m writing this from the future, but only because I came from the past. So many things in life feel that way, don’t they? Well, that’s just rhetoric.

I’m in Sydney because of my job, we’re running an event this coming Thursday. I feel so displaced, because one day I was at awake when they announced the passing of Lee Kuan Yew, and the next, just slightly less than twenty four hours later, I’m still awake cajoling myself to write, so that I don’t forget.

In my own ways, I have my own things to grieve for. Something deeply personal in me, not to do with Mr Lee, but something I will probably have to come face to face with very soon.

Cryptic, yes I know.

Mutterings and the littlest of words weigh the heaviest on my soul.

And I choose to deal by listening to things I cannot understand. To sounds and melodies that are dissonant, panged and not commonplace. To find solace in alien places, to find hope in the unknown.

I wish for so many things, but I don’t wish to be happy, if happiness was just a transient, fleeting, disposable emotion.

That changed after Sean died. [Nigel's] attitude was, ‘Make this as lo-fi as possible.’ Looking back I think grieving had a lot to do with that. All those sounds make no sense when you’re grieving. Instead it’s lo-fi, gritty and just a bit ‘fuck you’ when you’re in a lot of pain

- Jonnine Standish (HTRK), Interview with The Quietus, 6 September 2011

Mutterings; Little Words; Lo-Fi and just a bit fuck you

Journal, Leadership

We remark at what a great man and leader Lee Kuan Yew was. I’m intrigued at his leadership, benevolent dictatorship, a mix of fear and power.

On some level, he managed to rally an entire nation to his vision, not just his cabinet, but the populace. At the same time, he also removed every (political) distraction so that Singapore in the 60′s, 70′s and 80′s would be accelerated, and provided enough of a head start when the 90′s started.

Looking at that, he wasn’t interested in being a politician. Politics was just the means to give him the position, authority and influence to shape Singapore according to his vision. And that vision ultimately translated and trickled mostly to the pioneer generation that came before me. My grandparents, and my parents.

Lee Kuan Yew led the vision, but it inspired many others to sustain that vision and also tow that unbearable burden. It takes a certain kind of leader, and a certain kind of team (read: all Singaporeans) to wade through the uncertain mire, to stand up even when we fall, to always look towards tomorrow, that it is worth building.

I say, remember Lee Kuan Yew, and also, remember the generation before us, the sacrifices everyone made. Singapore did not arrive, an era has passed, but the story is still being written.

We close a chapter, dedicate another man to history, but we have not stopped writing history.

This message is also not just for Singaporeans, it’s not a nationalistic emotion I feel. This message is for every startup I’ve come across, every family and friend who face our own struggles and insurmountable mountains. May you find your strength and purpose, just as this man did.

Thoughts on Lee Kuan Yew

Futurist, General Knowledge

I’ve been reading with some interest on the recent comments made by US President, Barack Obama on Net Neutrality. On the one hand, Obama doesn’t want telcos and ISPs to be able to restrict the Internet speeds (The slow lane) of users and other content providers, simply because they’re not paying a premium. (Read)

In the other corner, Quartz suggest that “while the big telecoms may be willing to make concessions on discrimination and blocking, they will fight and tooth and nail to avoid any suggestion that the government should consider internet access a necessity of life rather than a consumer good.” (Read)

In the war of words, should an Internet connection be classified as a consumer good? Or is this a case of first-world-problem policy making?

Barack Obama and Net Neutrality

Starting Up

Today, independent journalism got some good news. Digital News Asia, a Malaysian technology news portal just announced raising RM1 million in seed funding from Idea River Run (IRR).

I’m bolstered because their CEO and Founder, Karamjit Singh has been quoted as saying, “One of the reasons this deal materialised was that Tan Sri Vincent was agreeable to DNA retaining its editorial independence… To our readers, rest assured that with editorial independence in the hands of the founders, we will always endeavour to deliver quality content to you – that is in our DNA,”

I, for one, am looking forward to the high quality journalism and analysis that these friends from across the border have built their brand around. And once again, congratulations, Karamjit, Asohan and Gabey!

DNA raises RM 1mil in Seed Funding


The dust settles as it’s bathed in moonlight

It really has been too long since I chronicled anything on this site, and while I did have a good run some time in September, I must have internalized somewhere that I didn’t need to update this on a regular basis.

Funny how as a twenty-plus year old, I didn’t understand why my thirty-plus contemporaries didn’t see the joy in updating their peers through online connectivity, and now that I’m at that age, and more importantly the stage in life, I can see why some aspects of online journaling do seem trivial. To me at least.

But that’s just my myopic preference to how much of the Internet I don’t like. There are still plenty of joys that I come across, fellow contemporaries whom I do appreciate for sharing their thoughts in the online realm, and if it’s a chance that I can contribute to the good of the Net, then I can only continue to participate.

Just don’t call me a “Netizen”.


WATCHLIST #03: 22 Sep 2014 – 28 Sep 2014

It’s the start of a new week, and I came out from a pretty hectic last one. I didn’t really get a chance to chance across new things, but the stand-outs from last week are definitely Nick Cave releasing the performance of Where The Wild Roses Grow that he did as a duet with Kylie Minogue for the filming of 20,000 Days. It was an amazing duet in 1996, and it still is 18 years later.

I also thoroughly enjoyed the new music video and song from Spazzkid. Sarah Bonito‘s guest vocals also add a cheeky hook to the playful beats, but the performance by Ayumi Yokoyama and the visual direction is probably what I’ll constantly remember this video for.

There’s a new game called Hack ‘n’ Slash coming out which sounds really interesting, and if you haven’t watched Community’s La Biblioteca rap, you should. Last one’s from Korean producer, Hitchhiker, which I’m still deciding if it’s good or bad. But damn, it’s trippy.

1. Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds – Where The Wild Roses Grow (Live at Koko) ft. Kylie Minogue
2. Spazzkid – “Truly” feat. Sarah Bonito (Official Video)
3. Hack ‘n’ Slash – Launch Trailer
4. La Biblioteca Rap
5. Hitchhiker 히치하이커_11(ELEVEN)_Music Video